Articles in Print

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Part I The Humanistic Psychologist

There is currently no single theory integrating all the various meanings of the self concept. The purpose of this paper is to develop an overarching metapsychology by which all aspects of the self can be understood. Consequently, this paper engages in an analysis of the self as it appears in cognitive-behavior psychology and the psychoanalytic theories of ego and self psychology. It is possible to identify two principle concepts by which the various aspects of the self can be compared and classified: the Conflation Frame, the collapsing of the various aspects of the self into a single rendering; and the Integral Interface, the theoretical framework within which each of these aspects of self can be appropriately differentiated and subsumed. 

Part II The Humanistic Psychologist

There is currently no single theory integrating all the various meanings of the self concept. The purpose of this paper is to develop an overarching metapsychology by which all aspects of the self can be understood. Consequently, this paper engages in an analysis of the self as it appears in humanistic-existential theories. As a result, it is possible to identify two principle concepts by which the various aspects of the self can be compared and classified: the Conflation Frame, the collapsing of the various aspects of the self into a single rendering; the Integral Interface, the theoretical framework within which each of these aspects of self can be appropriately differentiated and subsumed and; and the Integral Axes, the two tracks by which the individual grows and develops, that is, self-actualization and self-emancipation. 

Part III The Humanistic Psychologist

There is currently no single theory integrating all the various meanings of the self concept. The purpose of this paper is to develop an overarching metapsychology by which all aspects of the self can be understood. Consequently, this paper engages in an analysis of the self as it appears in transpersonal theories. As a result, it is possible to identify two principle concepts by which the various aspects of the self can be compared and classified: the S/self and the Twin-Tiers, the presence of both a lower self and deeper Self as aspects of the individual; as well as the presence of nondual reality (i.e., God), which is described relative to two fundamental processes: the Illusion of Relatedness and the Grid of Attention. 

The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies

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This paper claims that the ultimate issue confronting transpersonal theory is that of nondualism. However, scholarly accounts, such as those of Ken Wilber and David Loy, do not include or else misrepresent the spiritual revelation of a contemporary spiritual master crucial to the understanding of nondualism: Avatar Adi Da Samraj. Adi Da not only offers a more insightful account of nondual reality than can be found in contemporary scholarly texts, but also a dimension of nondualism not found in any previous spiritual revelation.

Ph.D. Dissertation: Saybrook Graduate School

The purpose of this dissertation is to develop an overarching metapsychology by which all aspects of the ego can be understood. To accomplish this, I engage an analysis of the ego as it appears in the psychodynamic theories of Freud and Jung and the nondual spiritual revelation of Adi Da Samraj. These three accounts correlate with the three broad categories within which all possible orientations toward the ego reside. As a result of this process, the nondualism of Adi Da emerges as the overriding context within which the psychic structure of Freud and Jung could be most clearly understood. 

M.A. Thesis: Sonoma State University

Transpersonal psychology is currently embroiled in a “dichotomy debate,” summarized by three fundamental errors : 1) arguing in favor of either higher and deeper consciousness, without realizing that they are essentially the same ; 2) collapsing the various levels of higher and deeper consciousness into a single level; and 3) confusing higher and deeper consciousness for Consciousness Itself (or God). The purpose of this paper is to extend the parameters of transpersonal psychology to include the true nature of “nondualism” or the true relationship of S/self to God.